Mets Card of the Week: 2007 Tom Glavine

2007 TOPPS FINEST TOM GLAVINE

2007 Tom Glavine

This shot of Tom Glavine wielding lumber got me thinking about the batting history of Mets pitchers. Here are some random hits and misses…

FEELS LIKE THE FIRST TIME

The first triple by a Mets pitcher was recorded by Bob L. “Don’t Call Me Bob G.” Miller on June 12, 1962. It came in the 6th inning of a 3-2 loss to Ken Johnson and the Colt .45s.

A little more than a year later, a Mets pitcher went yard for the first time, with Carl Willey connecting for a grand slam on July 15, 1963 in a 14-5 win over the Colt .45s. And the pitcher for Houston that day? You guessed it: none other than the very same Ken Johnson.

PITCH PERFECT

Myriad Mets pitchers have finished a season with a 1.000 average, but the majority of them have done so on the strength of a one-for-one campaign. Only two hurlers have finished a season with a 1.000 average by going two-for-two.

On September 28, 1988, big lefty David West singled off both Larry McWilliams and Dan Quisenberry, as the Mets rolled to a 14-1 victory over the Cardinals. These amounted to the only two at bats of West’s perfect season at the plate.

Jason Roach matched this performance on July 8, 2003, during the course of a 5-3 loss to the Braves. Roach swatted two singles off Shane Reynolds in his only two big-league at bats, thus ending not only the 2003 season but also his entire career with that vaunted 1.000 batting mark.

COULDN’T HIT IT SIDEWAYS

On the other end of the spectrum, many Mets pitchers have logged seasons of abject futility at the plate, ending with the ignominy of a .000 average, but only three have done so with more than 30 at bats to their name:

Randy Tate, 0-41 (1975)
Harry Parker, 0-36 (1974)
Ed Lynch, 0-33 (1982)

SYNCHRONICITY

Danny Frisella and Tug McGraw both hit .308 in 1970, each going 4 for 13. Bobby Jones and Pat Mahomes both hit .313 in 1999, each going 5 for 16.

And many miles away, something crawls to the surface of a dark Scottish lake. Or some such crap.

NOBODY DOES IT BETTER

Dwight Gooden owns the Mets record for most hits in a season by a pitcher, registering 21 in 1985. Damn, was there anything Gooden couldn’t do in 1985?

And I’m happy to report that Tom Seaver holds the franchise records for both home runs (3, in 1972) and RBI (10, in 1970) by a pitcher in a season, because of course he does.

CODA

Tom Glavine hit a total of 1 home run in 1,323 career at bats, a solo shot off John Smiley of the Reds on August 10, 1995.

9 comments for “Mets Card of the Week: 2007 Tom Glavine

  1. October 30, 2013 at 8:57 am

    I’ve got another one that I think you’ll like — Gooden and Seaver are tied for the all-time franchise record for triples by a pitcher, with five apiece.

  2. October 30, 2013 at 10:23 am

    2007 Tom Glavine………………..GRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR!

    • Eugene Hangley
      November 19, 2013 at 8:26 pm

      GO METS

  3. Doug Parker
    October 30, 2013 at 12:44 pm

    Charlie, I kept wondering if that was going to turn into a Tony the Tigeresque GRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRREEEEEAAAAATTTTT! But I should have known better…

  4. Metsense
    October 30, 2013 at 1:41 pm

    I hope Jason Roach at least sends Shane Reynolds a bottle every Christmas.
    August 20, 1983 the Police played Shea Stadium and I was there so:
    With one breath, with one flow, you will know, Synchronicity

  5. Doug
    October 30, 2013 at 3:56 pm

    I was at that Shea concert too, but more to see R.E.M. than The Police.

  6. Sean Flattery
    October 30, 2013 at 5:22 pm

    Mike Hampton might’ve been the best one they had albeit for one year. He had 20 hits for Mets in 2000, and hit 7 HR one year with Colorado.

    • Doug
      October 30, 2013 at 5:40 pm

      Yeah Sean, I was surprised to see that Hampton didn’t hit any HRs for the Mets in 2000.

  7. Jim OMalley
    October 30, 2013 at 8:04 pm

    Hampton was great…a big loss for the Mets after one year. If he had been there for three or four years, who knows what could have been. As far as Gooden goes, I was at a game mid summer in 1985; up in the bleachers, middle of the week. The place was packed. You could have heard a pin drop. A ll you heard after every pitch was the pop of the mitt. It was they greatest pitching performance I ever saw.

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