A look at Mets prospect P.J. Conlon

P.J. ConlonFor most Mets fans, when they think of the organization’s top prospect, the likes of Amed Rosario or Dominic Smith. Sure, these young position players are fantastic prospects and may pan out to be quality major league players. They have earned the right to be brought up in the conversation, due to their stellar play in the minor leagues. But I believe that there is a prospect that isn’t currently being talked about enough, and he hails from the other side of the Atlantic.

P.J Conlon, a southpaw that hails from Belfast, Northern Ireland, tore up his opponents last season in Single A ball. Drafted in the 13th round out of San Diego State, Conlon was noticed for his dazzling numbers and solid mechanics. Although his fastball rests in the 86-90 range, the rest of his arsenal picks up the slack with precise accuracy. For this reason, the Mets picked him up.

In his first minor league play with the Brooklyn Cyclones, Conlon was unspectacular. In 17 appearances in 2015, Conlon didn’t have the chance to start. He didn’t allow an earned run, and he struck out 25 batters. He was accredited with a loss on the season. 2016 is when Conlon made some real noise. Between A and High A ball last season, Conlon pitched to a stellar 12-2 record accompanied by a 1.65 ERA in 25 starts. To top that, he finished with a WHIP of .979 and 112 strikeouts.

Yes, these stats are very impressive. While it is only a small sample size at a lower level of professional ball, it does show that Conlon has a very high ceiling. Compared to current Mets lefty Steven Matz at the lower ball, Conlon blows him away. Does this mean Conlon is better than Matz? Not by any stretch. It does mean that if Conlon can keep those numbers around the same area, he should be a quality starter at the MLB level.

While prospects such as Rosario and Smith deserve the talk and praise, there are some players, or pitchers at least, that Conlon deserves to be ranked above. Justin Dunn, for example, is a talented prospect. He is very talented, but he should not be ranked above Conlon. Dunn only pitched in 11 games last season, compared to Conlon’s 25. Conlon produced better numbers in every statistical category besides ERA than Dunn, while pitching more games at a higher level. I believe that Dunn can be a very good pitcher, but as of now, he should not rank above Conlon.

In conclusion, if you do not know who Conlon is, you should find out soon. The Irish southpaw is a noteworthy prospect that doesn’t receive the attention that he deserves. While he doesn’t crack any top prospect lists, or hasn’t so far, he brings a certain flair to the mound that makes the lefty a stud. Although he does not pack earth-scorching heat, he does pack a strong enough arsenal that produced a 12-2 record in 2016. Conlon also packed a 1.65 ERA and a stellar WHIP of .979. Anyway you slice it, P.J should start to standout to Mets fans and baseball writers alike in the 2017 season.

9 comments for “A look at Mets prospect P.J. Conlon

  1. Eraff
    December 31, 2016 at 10:10 am

    Prospects below A+/AA are “ranked” predominantly based on talent….85-90 MPH lefties get a bit of forgiveness, but they are never highly regarded until they proved they can pitch at the MLB Level

  2. Jimmy P
    December 31, 2016 at 11:20 am

    Where he’s ranked is immaterial at this point — or ever. He’s on the radar. Now he needs to repeat that success at more demanding levels.

    LH pitchers are funny. We all know about Jamie Moyer. But there’s a lot of “Jamie Moyers” out there we’ve never heard about, because it’s damn hard to make it in the MLB with a fastball that doesn’t worry professional hitters. Glavine had a decent FB, uncanny control, and a plus-plus pitch with that changeup. He also came along at a time when umpires were inclined to call a pitch four inches off the plate a strike.

    At this point, I’m neither hopeful nor pessimistic. I’m just watching a green blip scroll across the radar screen . . . wandering out there over the sea . . . far from land.

    I wish him luck.

    • TexasGusCC
      December 31, 2016 at 5:52 pm

      For sure, if Glavine pitched today with Quez Tech (I think that what they call it), he would have gotten killed. Umpires would not have given him benefit of the doubt and have their numbers skewererd. A lefty junk baller pitched at the perfect time for the perfect team.

  3. LongTimeFan1
    December 31, 2016 at 2:44 pm

    I can’t get excited by Mr. Conlon whose lack of velocity is rather troubling and doesn’t bode well for success as he climbs the minor league ladder. He’d have to make himself into a left-handed Bartolo Colon rather than former first round pick Sean Gilmartin to have a chance to succeed in the upper levels let alone reach and succeed in the majors.

    • Name
      December 31, 2016 at 5:09 pm

      You do realize Colon was a flamethrower when he first came up?

      And then when he flamed out he started using PEDs to cheat his way back and is now depriving honest men of making of living.

  4. LongTimeFan1
    December 31, 2016 at 2:50 pm

    I am of course rooting for him but he is indeed a wait and see type. If he can add some velocity as some other Mets pitching prospects have done, that will certainly help.

  5. December 31, 2016 at 6:46 pm

    Justin Dunn should absolutely be ranked above Conlon. Dunn, a first-round pick, age 20, with that debut is something to be excited about. He throws four pitches, has hit 99 on the radar and has made great strides in cutting his walk rate.

  6. Eraff
    December 31, 2016 at 11:58 pm

    “Young Tom Glavine” was 92-94 with a very strong repertoire and location. He was never 85-90 at any point that would have been identified as his peak

    Moyer was highly unusual… a guy who never had velocity… but he had amazing movement in the mid and low 80s, which is a mystery to me…. and it was a mystery to hitters.

  7. Stevie G
    January 4, 2017 at 12:41 am

    Everyone needs to get off this hype on velocity. There are lots of pitchers in the minor leagues who throw in the mid 90’s but are going nowhere. I know Conlon’s numbers were in low A and High A but there are some quality hitters down there. 24 walks in 148+ innings. C’mon now. I don’t care if even that’s in little league that’s some pretty damn good numbers. You can’t teach heart and this kid takes the mound like he owns it and carries himself with class and character. Nothing rattles him and he has the heart of a lion. How can ya not root for this kid. And he’s from Belfast and a Glasgow Celtic fan on top of everything . That’s about as good a it gets

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