Mets’ Ruben Amaro Jr. shares insights on GM candidates and his own future

He actually interviewed Chaim Bloom more than a decade ago for a job with the Phillies, and came to regret not hiring him. “He’s aggressive in a very good way, and very intelligent,” Amaro says of his subsequent interactions with Bloom.

When Doug Melvin was GM of the Milwaukee Brewers, he and Amaro were close, and Amaro came to view Melvin as a creative thinker and mentor.

“Doug is a good person,” Amaro says. “He’s one of those guys that was a mentoring type of GM. I gravitated toward the Doug Melvins and the Walt Jockettys of the world. The Cashmans, and the Kevin Towers of the world, God bless his soul.

snip

As for agent Brodie Van Wagenen, Amaro negotiated with him many times, and always found the interactions ethical and respectful.

“Brodie is a good baseball person,” Amaro says. “He’s a guy who knows baseball. He pays attention. He is a guy that has aspirations of doing great things in baseball, so I’m not really all that surprised by him being a candidate for this job. He’s just a good person. A good guy. There’s always discussions when you’re talking to an agent about his clients, but always very respectful with Brodie. I always had very good constructive discussions with him. It’s clear he understands the game.”

Source: Andy Martino, MetsBlog

3 comments for “Mets’ Ruben Amaro Jr. shares insights on GM candidates and his own future

  1. TexasGusCC
    October 25, 2018 at 6:06 pm

    Wow! I just read the news flash! Doug Melvin is out! Shocking!

    • Mike Walczak
      October 25, 2018 at 6:32 pm

      Awesome !!!!

  2. TexasGusCC
    October 25, 2018 at 8:23 pm

    I pulled the carpet out from under Amaro earlier by commenting on the GMs, but I’d like to take a minute to tip my hat to Amaro.

    Although we have heard him called “No future Ruben” for extending his 30+ aged core of champions in Philly, he tried to keep the success going and that shouldn’t be mocked. He’s a smart guy and the Mets are better because they have him mentoring young players hands-on. He has experience and knowledge to share, and I have never heard of a GM humble himself all the way down to first base coach, but I think he should be in the other coach’s box and would be a good addition to a front office.

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